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Take Back Your Time Day

October 20th, 2006 · 2 Comments

Next week we observe National Take Back Your Time Day (Oct. 24). This date, nine weeks before the end of the year, recognizes the additional nine weeks that researchers say Americans are working in comparison with Western Europeans.

While we can counter that we may be more productive because of the extra hours worked, it is not beneficial if you end up feeling overworked, over-scheduled, and stressed. We only average just over two weeks per year in vacation, and in fact many of us are not even taking our allotted time. For more on that aspect, read my article, “Vacation Deprivation, consequences of the ‘workaholic mindset’ “.

Take Back Your Time Day is not anti-work. Work can be both useful and fulfilling. The problem arises when life gets out of balance, with work concerns overriding family, community, and health. If you want to learn more about this day, visit the initiating group’s website at http://www.timeday.org/.

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Tags: Changing Times · Time Management · Work Hours · Work Life Balance

2 responses so far ↓

  • 1 Pharmaceutical // Jan 25, 2007 at 1:04 pm

    I wonder how American Health Management Association provides medical records professionals with educational resources and programs? WBR LeoP

  • 2 Denise // Jan 25, 2007 at 2:01 pm

    For medical records professionals, there are a couple of different factors in managing records. One is the actual system for the records themselves, which is hopefully well structured. The other one is how the professionals find the time to get the records into the appropriate file. Things that interfere with being able to keep records up to date include scheduling your day for maximum productivity and coping with all of the paperwork associated with that job other than those actual records. In December I did a training session for the Houston Area Health Information Management Association, talking to them about managing their daily paper flow and structuring their day so that they can be as productive as possible. It was very well received because everyone is struggling with too much to do in too little time. If you are looking for some ideas on techniques for handling time, paper, or email, I have a CD set created from some of my seminars that you might explore.